Klug und Zucker aus Chemnitz

This time Sabine brings us again to Chemnitz to talk about names, to play with words and to offer some memories of two brilliant local composers between the 50s and the 90s.


Sabine ci porta di nuovo a Chemitz, stavolta per parlarci di nomi, giocare con le parole e raccontarci di due problemisti attivi in città tra gli anni ’50 e ’90.

[Testo in Italiano]

(Sabine)

I would like to start this post by telling my readers something about the very name of Chemnitz. It derives directly from the name of the river that runs through the city before merging with the Zwickauer Mulde. The name of the river goes back to the Slavic name “Kamenica” (“stony brook”), from the Upper Sorbian word kamen (stone).

From 1143 to 1630, the name Kameniz underwent several adaptations from Kamenizensis Conventus, Kemeniz, Kempniz, Kempnicz to finally Chemnitz. Then in 1953, under the influence of the Soviet regime, the name of the city was changed into Karl-Marx-Stadt; only in 1990, further to the German Reunification, a referendum allowed the large majority of the citizens to vote for restoring the original name of Chemnitz.

It was during the GDR years that Helmut Klug and Manfred Zucker had been actively contributing the local chess community, in particular with their chess problem creations.

Klug small

Helmut Klug (1921-1981) learned to play chess as a child and, later, grew up as a chess problem composer and organiser of chess tournaments, sharing these passions along with his main occupation as professional merchant and photographer. He was a long-time member of the “Commission for Problems and Studies”, established by the German Chess Federation in Karl-Marx-Stadt in October 1957.

Klug founded, together with Herbert Küchler and Manfred Zucker, the trio “Schachecke” (“The chess corner”), that regularly published problems on the  “Volksstimme” (“The People’s Voice”), a regional newspaper based in Karl-Marx-Stadt; in 1963, the “Volksstimme” merged with another newspaper, the “Zwickauer Kreiszeitung” (“The Zwickau Gazette”) to start the “Freie Presse“ (“The Free Press”).

WeberGalkePohlheimMasanekKlug
The Members of the “Commission for Problems and Studies” in 1963
From the left: Wolfgang Weber, Kurt Galke, Karl Pohlheim, Erwin Masanek and Helmut Klug
[Picture property of Manfred Zucker, who agreed to have it freely published on Wikimedia Commons – CC BY-SA 3.0]

His carreer as composer started in 1954, with many of his creations developed together with Manfred Zucker. This is one of his problems, published on the “Freie Presse” on 16th March 1963.

Klug #3 - 1963
Helmut Klug, 1963
White moves and mates in 3 moves

Solution (highlight the text between brackets to make it visible):
[1.Nf5! exf5 2. Rf4 b4 3. Rxf5# If. 1. … e5 2. Ne7 exd4 3. Nd6# If 1. … b4 2. Kc6 exf5 3. Rd5#]

Manfred Zucker (1938-2013), started to play chess in his early childhood. At the age of 14 he joined the former BSG (Betriebssportgemeinschaft) Motor IFA Karl-Marx-Stadt chess section, which is now known as TSV (Turn- und Sportverein) IFA Chemnitz.

Zucker small

Once he completed his studies, he started to work as wholesaler, ending to become manager of the “Cooperative of Agricultural Engineering”. He was very passionate about chess problems and devoted a great deals of energy to his beloved long problems and selfmates, that he skilfully mastered. In 1972, FIDE awarded him the “International Judge of Chess Compositions” title. He was also a good player at the board, being a specialist of the Morra Gambit.

He started to create chess problems in the 50s and worked regularly with Klug and Küchler, contributing to the creations of the trio “Schachecke” with his characteristic clean style and his preferences for a strict economy in the use of resources.

Weißenfels
Meeting of the “Commission for Problems and Studies” in 1976 at the Goldener Ring Hotel in Weißenfels. From the left: Karl Pohlheim, Horst Böttger, Günter Schiller, Manfred Zucker, Karl-Heinz Siehndel, Helmut Klug and Fritz Hoffmann
[Picture by Dr. László Lindner, donated to Manfred Zucker, who agreed to have it freely published on Wikimedia Commons – CC BY-SA 3.0]

Here you are with one of his trademark problems: a helpmate in 3 moves, showing an elegant and symmetrical composition, published in September 1975 on “Schweizerische Schachzeitung”. [Unoscacchista: I remind the readers that in helpmates Black moves first and cooperates with White to get mated; in the problem below, White gives mate with his third move]

Zucker h#3 - 1975
Manfred Zucker, 1973
Helpmate in 3 moves

Solution (highlight the text between brackets to make it visible):
[1.Rb7 Nce5 2. Rg7 Nf7 3. 0-0 Ngh6#]

By Klug and Zucker (that could be translated into English with the unlikely couple “Smart and Sugar”), I offer you a tough direct mate in 6 moves, published on 20th December 1968 on the “Freie Presse” and winner of the 2nd prize “Weihnachts- und Neujahrgruß”. The position is a bit overloaded by all the black pawns, but the solving mechanism is just brilliant.

Klug-Zucker #6, 1968
Klug e Zucker, 1968
White moves and mates in 6 moves

Solution (highlight the text between brackets to make it visible):
[If the White Bishop had access to the a2-g8 diagonal, the solution would be Rf7+ and Bb3# or Bc4#, because all the flight dark squares are controlled either by the Kd8 or by the pawns in d4 and c5. Let’s see if it works.

  • If 1. Bd3 Bf1!, parrying the threat, because after 2. Bxf1 e2 follows, while if 2. Bc2 Bc4 avoids the checkmate.
  • If 1. Bc2 Rb1!, again preventing the mating maneuver to be carried out, since after 2. Bxb1 b3 3. Bd3 Bf1! 4. Bxf1 e2 there is no checkmate in sight.

We must resolve to a different mating pattern, that can be built with the sequence Bh7, Rf7 and (after the Black King captures the pawn in e6) Bg8: the forthcoming discovery check with Rf4 will deliver checkmate. Let’s see if and how Black can defend.

  • If 1. Bh7 g3! and after 2. Rf7+ Kxe6 3. Bg8 Kd5 4. Rf4+ (otherwise the King escapes in e4 or takes in d4) Be6 there is no checkmate. We should try to deflect the Bf1.
  • If. 1. Bd3 Bf1! 2. Bh7 Rh1! 3. Rf7+ Kxe6 4. Bg8 Rh8! and, again, there is no checkmate. We must deflect the Black Rook.
  • If 1. Bc2 Rb1! 2. Bh7 g3! and, as already seen above, after 3. Rf7+ Kxe6 4. Bg8 Kd5 5. Rf4+ (otherwise the King escapes in e4 or takes in d4) Be6 again there is no checkmate.

For cracking the problem, we must deflect both the rook and the bishop. This is the solution,  eventually:

  • 1. Bc2! Rb1! 2. Bd3! Bf1! 3. Bh7! g3 (or any other move) 4. Rf7+ Kxe6 5. Bg8 and there is no way to avoid the checkmate, e.g. 5. … Kd5 6. Rf4#

What did I tell you? The solving mechanism is exquisite!]


[English Version]

(Sabine)

Mi piace iniziare questo articolo raccontando ai miei lettori qualcosa del nome della città di Chemnitz. Deriva direttamente dal nome del fiume omonimo che la attraversa prima di confluire nella Zwickau Mulde. Il nome del fiume è l’adattamento del nome originale in lingua soraba superiore “Kamenica“, che significa letteralmente “Torrente con sassi” (il termine “Kamen” significa infatti “pietra, sasso”).

Tra il 1143 e il 1630, c’è traccia del nome Kameniz via via modificato in Kamenizensis Conventus, Kemeniz, Kempniz, Kempnicz e infine Chemnitz. Poi si arriva fino al 1953 quando, sotto l’influenza del regime sovietico, il nome della città fu cambiato in Karl-Marx-Stadt; fu solo nel 1990, dopo la caduta del muro e la riunificazione tedesca, che con un referendum gli abitanti della città poterono votare (a maggioranza schiacciante) il ripristino del nome di Chemnitz.

Fu durante il periodo della Repubblica Democratica Tedesca che Helmut Klug e Manfred Zucker parteciparono attivamente alla vita scacchistica locale, in particolare con le loro creazioni problemistiche.

Klug small

Helmut Klug (1921-1981), imparò a giocare a scacchi da bambino e divento, in età adulta, un compositore di problemi e un organizzatore di manifestazioni scacchistiche abbastanza famoso, passioni che condivideva con la sua vita da commerciante e da fotografo. Fu a lungo membro della “Commissione per i Problemi e gli Studi”, creata dalla Federazione Scacchistica Tedesca proprio a Karl-Marx-Stadt nell’Ottobre del 1957.

Klug fu anche uno dei fondatori, assieme a Herbert Küchler e Manfred Zucker, del trio “Schachecke” (“L’angolo degli scacchi”), che pubblicava regolarmente problemi sulla “Volksstimme” (“La voce del Popolo”), giornale regionale di Karl-Marx-Stadt; questo quotidiano nel 1963 si fuse con la “Zwickauer Kreiszeitung” (“La Gazzetta di Zwickau”) nel giornale regionale “Freie Presse“ (“La Libera Stampa”).

WeberGalkePohlheimMasanekKlug
I componenti della “Commissione per i Problemi e gli Studi” nel 1963
da sinistra: Wolfgang Weber, Kurt Galke, Karl Pohlheim, Erwin Masanek e Helmut Klug
[Foto di Manfred Zucker, che ne ha concesso la pubblicazione gratuita su Wikimedia Commons – CC BY-SA 3.0]

La sua carriera da compositore cominciò nel 1954 e molte delle sue creazioni furono sviluppate assieme a Manfred Zucker. Questa una sua composizione pubblicata sul “Freie Presse” il 16 Marzo del 1963.

Klug #3 - 1963
Helmut Klug, 1963
Il Bianco muove e matta in 3 mosse

Soluzione (evidenziare il testo tra parentesi quadre per visualizzarla):
[1.Cf5! exf5 2. Tf4 b4 3. Txf5# Se. 1. … e5 2. Ce7 exd4 3. Cd6# Se 1. … b4 2. Rc6 exf5 3. Td5#]

Manfred Zucker (1938-2013), cominciò a giocare a scacchi molto presto e già a 14 anni giocava nel circolo scacchistico BSG (Betriebssportgemeinschaft) Motor IFA Karl-Marx-Stadt, conosciuto oggi come TSV (Turn- und Sportverein) IFA Chemnitz.

Zucker small

Finiti gli studi e avviata la sua attività come commerciante all’ingrosso, divenne dirigente della “Cooperativa per l’Ingegneria Agraria”. Si dedicò anche con passione alla creazione di problemi scacchistici, con una predilezione per i matti in più mosse e gli automatti, spesso di grande difficoltà risolutiva. Nel 1972 la FIDE gli concesse il titolo di “Giudice Internazionale per la Composizione”. Fu  anche un buon giocatore a tavolino, specialista del Gambetto Morra.

Cominciò a comporre negli anni ’50 e molti dei suoi problemi furono creati assieme a Klug e Küchler, contribuendo al trio “Schachecke” con la sua caratteristica predilezione per l’economia nella costruzione delle posizioni.

Weißenfels
Riunione della “Commissione per i Problemi e gli Studi” nel 1976 all’Hotel Goldener Ring in Weißenfels. Da sinistra: Karl Pohlheim, Horst Böttger, Günter Schiller, Manfred Zucker, Karl-Heinz Siehndel, Helmut Klug e Fritz Hoffmann
[Foto del Dr. László Lindner, donata a Manfred Zucker, che ne ha concesso la pubblicazione gratuita su Wikimedia Commons – CC BY-SA 3.0]

Ecco una sua tipica composizione: un aiutomatto in 3 mosse di elegante composizione simmetrica, pubblicato nel Settembre del 1975 su “Schweizerische Schachzeitung”. [Unoscacchista: ricordo che negli aiutomatti, il Nero collabora con il Bianco per ricevere lo scacco matto e muove per primo; nel problema qui sotto, il Bianco dà scacco matto con la sua terza mossa]

Zucker h#3 - 1975
Manfred Zucker, 1973
Aiutomatto in 3 mosse

Soluzione (evidenziare il testo tra parentesi quadre per visualizzarla):
[1.Tb7 Cce5 2. Tg7 Cf7 3. 0-0 Cgh6#]

Di Klug e Zucker (che in italiano si potrebber tradurre con l’improbabile accoppiata “Brillante e Zucchero”), vi propongo un difficile matto in 6 mosse, pubblicato il 20 Dicembre del 1968 sul “Freie Presse” e vincitore del secondo premio “Weihnachts- und Neujahrgruß”. La composizione è un po’ appesantita da tutti quei pedoni neri, ma il meccanismo risolutivo è eccellente.

Klug-Zucker #6, 1968
Klug e Zucker, 1968
Il Bianco muove e matta in 6 mosse

Soluzione (evidenziare il testo tra parentesi quadre per visualizzarla):
[Se l’alfiere Bianco avesse accesso alla diagonale a2-g8, potrebbe seguire la manovra Tf7+ e Ab3# o Ac4#, visto che le case di fuga nere sono controllate dal Rd8 e dai pedoni d4 e c5.

  • Se 1. Ad3 Af1!, impedendo la manovra perchè a 2. Axf1 segue e2, mentre a 2. Ac2 segue adesso Ac4.
  • Se 1. Ac2 Tb1!, rendendo di nuovo la manovra programmata insufficiente, perchè dopo 2. Axb1 b3 3. Ad3 Af1! 4. Axf1 e2 non c’è matto in vista.

Bisogna fare ricorso ad un’altra costruzione di matto, che è rappresentata dalla manovra Ah7, Tf7 e (dopo che il Re Nero ha catturato in e6) Ag8: lo scacco di scoperta Tf4 porterà al matto. Vediamo le difese che ha ha disposizione il Nero.

  • Se 1. Ah7 g3! e dopo 2. Tf7+ Rxe6 3. Ag8 Rd5 4. Tf4+ (altrimenti il Re fugge in e4 o prende in d4) Ae6 e non c’è scacco matto. Proviamo ad utilizzare la deviazione in f1 dell’Alfiere Nero.
  • Se. 1. Ad3 Af1! 2. Ah7 Th1! 3. Tf7+ Rxe6 4. Ag8 Th8! e non c’è nessun matto. Dobbiamo riuscire a deviare la Torre.
  • Se 1. Ac2 Tb1! 2. Ah7 g3! e, come abbiamo visto prima, dopo 3. Tf7+ Rxe6 4. Ag8 Rd5 5. Tf4+ (altrimenti il Re fugge in e4 o prende in d4) Ae6 e non c’è scacco matto.

Dobbiamo combinare opportunamente le due deviazioni. Ecco la soluzione:

  • 1. Ac2! Tb1! 2. Ad3! Af1! 3. Ah7! g3 (o altre mosse) 4. Tf7+ Rxe6 5. Ag8 e non c’è modo di evitare il matto; 5. … Rd5 6. Tf4#

Vi avevo detto che il meccanismo risolutivo è sopraffino!]

One thought on “Klug und Zucker aus Chemnitz

Add yours

Rispondi

Questo sito usa Akismet per ridurre lo spam. Scopri come i tuoi dati vengono elaborati.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d blogger hanno fatto clic su Mi Piace per questo: